Learning and Pandemic Readiness

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This is an update toFlu Pandemic: Compliance or Readiness” posted in February.

As of November 12, 2007 the World Health Organization has confirmed 335 cases of H5N1 in humans. Nearly two thirds of those infected have died (206 deaths). The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is funding pandemic planning activities across the nation, yet for many organizations this is not a priority. It’s not even on the back burner.   

Imagine all organizations (vendors, customers, utilities, etc.) experiencing 35% absenteeism (35% is the projection). In that environment, our current model of “just in time” economics will not succeed.

Organizations need to develop contingency plans by trouble shooting to identify options for a successful strategy. Training professionals need to be at the core of this endeavor. Will your team be ready to deliver a life saving message when the time arrives? For a high level overview for the issue, watch Scott McPherson and Elliott Masie’s discussion, Learning and Pandemic Readiness recorded at The MASIE Center’s Learning 2007 this past October.  

These particular plans may not need to be put into action (Although an epidemiologists friend at the CDC says it’s only a matter of time before a pandemic strikes). It may not be bird flu that hits us, but as Dwight D. Eisenhower said, In preparing for battle I have always found that plans are useless, but planning is indispensable.

This entry was posted in absenteeism, cdc, elearning, environmental, epidemiology, Government, infection, Leadership, Safety, technology, Training. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Learning and Pandemic Readiness

  1. Infction Protection says:

    Are they going to be ready for the bird flu with this massive Turkey outbreak?
    The risk of new cases of the deadly H5N1 bird flu virus “remains high,” said Chief Veterinary Officer of the U.K., Fred Landeg. The virulent strain of influenza has killed more than 200 people worldwide since 2003 and millions of birds either have died from it or been killed to prevent its spread.
    http://care-mates.com/blog/?p=4

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